Chinese Inventions | What "Made in China" Means in History

Chinese Inventions | What "Made in China" Means in History

Interested in finding out what the Chinese inventions are and "firsts" that the country is known for? For much of the last century, China has earned a reputation of being a copycat with low-quality knockoffs. "Made in China" was not something to be proud of. Justified as this may be, it has not always been this way. Throughout China's 5,000 years of history, they have been known for some very interesting "firsts" and some truly revolutionary inventions. Below is a collection of the most important - and the most crazy - inventions that have been attributed to China. It should come as no surprise that China is known for developing different foods and drinks that we know today. I mean, we all love Chinese food, right? But what you might find interesting is what they claim to be purely Chinese inventions. Here are just a couple. According to a discovery made near China's Yellow River in 2005, China invented noodles 4,000 years ago. Here's what they looked like, and you will be forgiven if you wonder how the archaeologists realized these were actually noodles. These thin, yellow noodles were found inside a sealed bowl in a place in northwestern China known as "Lajia". It's important to note that several countries claim to have invented ice cream. China is just one of many. And when China says "ice cream", what they are referring to is a frozen recipe of milk, a rice mixture and snow that was developed back in 200 BC. Keep in mind that this is a far cry from the ice cream you know and love today. Still, it probably provided the same refreshing feeling during a hot Chinese summer. According to Chinese legend, tea was first discovered in 2737 BCE (yes, you read that right) who preferred to have his water boiled before drinking. A dead leave somehow fell into his water and tea was accidentally discovered as a beverage. China is home to the earliest surviving records of tea drinking, dating back to the first millennium BC. Chinese records show that tea was used medicinally during the Han Dynasty (206 BC-220 AD) but did not gain widespread popularity as a beverage until the around the Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD). It's difficult to think of a world without paper products, but it's true. Paper had to be invented, and these are the products that China claims to to be Chinese inventions first. Did you know that China was the first recorded society to use paper money? It's true. We have historical records showing paper money during the Tang Dynasty in the 7th century. It's use evolved from merchant receipts of deposit and was widely printed by the government after a copper shortage. As you can see above, the paper money was fairly rudimentary, but it did the job. Interestingly, the first documented use of toilet paper dates back to the 6th century in China. However, this toilet paper was only used by the Imperial Court (i.e. the Chinese emperor and his family). It is believed that the following discoveries are scraps of toilet paper. No, seriously. Records show that by the early 14th century, millions of toilet paper packages were being mass-produced in China annually. The world's oldest surviving book is Chinese. It's a Buddhist text called the Diamond Sutra, which bears the date 868 AD. Along with other printed manuscripts, the book was discovered in 1907 in a walled-up cave in Dunhang (north-west China) and is on display at the British Library. Even before the development of paper, the Chinese were using woodblock printing to print on silk, which is amazing. The earliest surviving woodblock printed are silk fragments that date back to the Han Dynasty. Before this (as in 3,000 years ago), Chinese were recording events in a written language on what are known as Oracle Bones. These bones and turtle shells with about 4,000 character markings were found in the early 1900s by archeologists. Every country has a history of wartime inventions. China's just happens to be thousands of years old and is the foundation for many modern-day fighting machines. Considered one of the "four great inventions of ancient China", gunpowder first made an appearance in China in the 9th century. Chinese alchemists accidentally discovered gunpowder while searching for an elixir for immortality (or so the story goes). Ironic, considering what it's used for, do not you think? Its introduction to Europe around 1300 would have an enormous effect (the first recorded use was by the English against the French in 1346). The Chinese are credited with inventing the crossbow back in the 5th century BC. According to Chinese texts from 200 BC, credit for this invention goes to a Mr. Ch'in, who was able to develop the crossbow with a range of over 650 feet. The invention was transmitted to Europe during the Middle Ages fifteen centuries later. Hundreds of years later, legendary military strategist Zhuge Liang (181-234 AD) is credited with inventing the repeating crossbow. This kind of bow was capable of firing 10 bolts in 15 seconds. Martial arts was first practiced in China around the 5th century BC. According to legend, Shaolin kung fu originated about a thousand years later (5th/6th century) from Bodhidharma, a Buddhist monk from India. Today, we tend to associate Chinese martial arts with the popular genre of film that comes out of China. Popular figures such as Jet Li, Jackie Chan and Bruce Lee turned this form of fighting into more of an entertainment. In addition to the consumables and paper goods, China is also known for inventing - or at least being the first recorded user - of a number of different goods and materials. These products are a result of the fascinating culture and traditions in China's history. Here is a look at a few of the most revolutionary Chinese inventions you may not have known about. Two centuries before Gutenburg invented his printing press (1450), China has records of a movable type printing press in 1040 AD. These records come from the Song Dynasty in China, and the invention later made its way to Korea in the 13th century. Credit for this invention of the Chinese movable type printing press goes to a man named Bi Sheng. The movable type replaced the block printing method, which required characters to be engraved into an entire block for printing. Obviously, this was both time consuming and costly, but more than that, it did not allow for quick changes to be made. According to British scientist and historian Sir Joseph Needman, China invented eyeglasses over 1,000 years ago. By the time Marco Polo arrived in China around 1270, eyeglasses (which he mentions in his accounts) were widely used in Chinese upper class. Amazingly, some scientists claim they've found Chinese glasses from as early as 200 BC. These glasses were unearthed in the south (Guizhou, Yunnan, Guangzhou) and west (Xinjiang) of China and revealed a surprisingly advanced glass-making technology for the time. The earliest evidence of silk dates back to around 4,000-3,000 BC in Shanxi province, where a culture silk cocoon was found. However, the earliest evidence of silk fabric dates back to around 2700BC. It remained a secret for thousands of years, despite the fact that it became widely exported. The Romans, who were great admirers of silk, believed that the fabric was taken from trees. It's unclear how or when the secret was lost. However, it was transmitted to Japan around 300AD (brought there by four Chinese girls according to one legend). Another popular legend says that the secret was transmitted to India via a Chinese princess who hid some eggs in the lining of her head dress. Another legend has it that European monks-who were sent to China in the sixth century to discover the secret of silk-smuggled some silkworm eggs out. The Chinese invented the world's first seismograph, or earthquake detector, in 132 AD. You can see an example below. During an earthquake, the earth's movement would cause a ball to fall, indicating the direction of the quake. Quite ingenious. (although it should not be a surprise if you read these facts and figures about Chinese education). China is credited with inventing the hot air balloon during the Three Kingdoms era (220-80 AD). These unmanned balloons, known as Kongming lanterns, were airborne lanterns that were initially used for military signaling. Later, these lanterns were adopted all across southeast Asia. Even today, thousands of these lanterns can be seen floating through the air in Thailand during the Loi Krathong festival. Some of the world's earliest pottery was found in a Yuchanyan Cave in southern China. A 2009 report of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reports that it dates back to 18,000 years ago. The Chinese invention of porcelain came around the Han Dynasty (206-220 AD). This is when experts estimated the Chinese were baking pottery at extremely high temperatures (1260-1300 C) to produce high-quality, thin and hard porcelain. During the Tang Dynasty (618-907), porcelain was mass-produced in large quanties and exported to the Islamic world. When it reached Europe, it was called "china". It's clear that China has a long history of innovation, as evidenced by all of these Chinese inventions. The people of China are proud of this culture of innovation and if you take the time to listen, they will tell you all about the "Four Great Inventions of Ancient China". Slowly, modern China is changing the narrative back to its historical roots. They want to earn the reputation of being innovative again, to redefine what "Made in China" really means.

추천 기사
What Are Araya Rims Made of? Should I Replace Them?
Um from experience new 700c wheels have curve in the rim wall so the tire bead stay even at high pressure .but that nice vintage aray rim wall has no curve in the rime because it was not designed for high pressure tires . Old rims mostly was disigned for low pressure gumwall tire for a comfortable ride . In the bicycle world the old bouncy steel smooth tire 10 speed was considered a Cadillac because of its smooth ride.^,^1. Have any experiments been performed on the magnetic properties of neodymium at high pressure and temperature?Do not think that pure Nd is ferromagnetic (maybe it's antiferromagnetic?), so your question about the Curie temperature really applies to just certain ferromagnetic alloys of Nd. Not aware of any high-P studies on those ferromagnetic alloys offhand. I was a co-author of a paper that looked at the magnetic properties of the heavy lanthanides (which are ferromagnetic) under pressure, and we found that their Curie temperatures dropped with pressure at a $dT_c/dP$ rate of around -10 to -20 K/GPa (See High-pressure magnetic susceptibility experiments on the heavy lanthanides Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, and Tm). If Nd alloys have $T_c's$ which drop at similar rates, then I would not expect any magnetism in them at the pressure and temperature of the core-mantle boundary (140 GPa and 5000 C)2. 3 ton tempstar heatpump with a 3.5 ton airhandler on a 45 deg, day what should the low and high pressure be?I very much doubt a setting done by a technician charging a system such as yours. First, you cannot do that with two gages. Its not even possible, and second there is NO exact pressure setting for a given system. It depends on air pressure, humidity and relative humidity to set the charge of gas correctly which would result in a "correct pressure " reading. The method most commonly used is a "super heat" method. Here a sling is swirled thru the air and the RH of the air is determined. Next, the exit air from the air blower inside the house is determined. Along with the outside and inside air temps. Then and only then, a chart inside the cabinet of the AC or heat pump is read to find the correct charge pressure. Without taking any of these needed measurements, no pressure reading can be determined. What is happening nation wide is the charging of these new high efficiency units is being done incorrectly, and given that the efficiency numbers that people paid so much for to get (the SEER) are no where near reached. Ive yet to see a service tech ever properly charge a system NEVER ever saw it done. If you want to find out exactly how to charge an AC and what pressures your system is required to have for a given temps and given RH. get a manual and read it as that is a very good way to learn about it so you would never be fooled. X Trane Engineer.3. Metal Halide vs High Pressure Sodium for plants?Be careful as these lamps generate a lot of heat. You will need some sort of ventilation to avoid overheating the plants. Keep in mind law enforcement agencies look for thermal signatures to find illegal pot production.4. Easy questions about weather?! Ten points!?Atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface is one of the keys to weather, which is one reason weather maps feature H's and L's, representing areas of high and low air pressure. High and low pressure areas are important because they affect the weather. The weather maps, such as those on television, show what is happening at the Earth's surface, and that's what we are talking about here. As the name says, a "high" is an area where the air's pressure is higher than the pressure of the surrounding air. A "low' is where it's lower. Meteorologists do not have any particular number that divides high from low pressure; it's the relative differences that count. The pressure is high at the surface where air is slowly descending - much too slowly to feel. And, this is going on over a large area, maybe a few hundred square miles. As air descends, it warms, which inhibits the formation of clouds. This is why high pressure is generally - but not quite always - associated with good weather. The air that descends in high-pressure areas has to get to high altitudes in some way, and its done by rising in areas where the pressure at the surface is low. As air rises it cools. As the air cools, the humidity in it begins to condense into tiny drops of water, or if it's cold enough, into tiny ice crystals. If there's enough water or ice, rain or snow begin to fall. This is why low pressure is associated with bad weather. As shown in the graphic above, the air descending in high pressure flows out in a clockwise spiral in the Northern Hemisphere. Air flowing into an area of low pressure rises, making a counterclockwise spiral on the way in.
Droid Vs Blackberry Vs Iphone? HELP!?
Why Do Software Developers Tend to Leave a Company After 2 Or so Years?
Business Activities
Xiaomi Family Launched Intelligent Clothes Dryer
How to Explain Coding Is Not Just Copy and Paste to Non Software Developers? [closed]
2002 Asian Athletics Championships Women's High Jump
Why Is My Laptop's Fan so Loud?
Best Way to Cool Air Fast?
Are Clouds Pockets of Warm Air?
related searches
What Are Araya Rims Made of? Should I Replace Them?
Droid Vs Blackberry Vs Iphone? HELP!?
Why Do Software Developers Tend to Leave a Company After 2 Or so Years?
Business Activities
Xiaomi Family Launched Intelligent Clothes Dryer
How to Explain Coding Is Not Just Copy and Paste to Non Software Developers? [closed]
2002 Asian Athletics Championships Women's High Jump
Why Is My Laptop's Fan so Loud?
Best Way to Cool Air Fast?

Copyright © 2020 Concises YuGa Sports | Sitemap